Misplaced Resentment


Misplaced Resentment

            The left has been using class warfare as a campaign tactic for sometime now.  Why?  Because it works.  It’s easy to get people to resent others who are more fortunate than they are, and parlay that resentment into votes.  Since they won the last two presidential elections, we must conclude that they are good at choosing campaign tactics that work.  Too bad they’re not so good at choosing policies that work once they win.
            Resenting someone, simply because they have more money than you, is not a good quality.  Envy is one of the seven deadly sins, and the tenth commandment says that we shall not covet anything that is our neighbor’s.  For those of you that automatically reject anything connected to with religion, check out my earlier “Barbecue Grill” post.
            It’s hard to not resent the super rich; it almost comes naturally, especially if things are not going that well for you.  Even if you know that you should cast that resentment away, it seems like it can creep up on you whenever you let your guard down.  Maybe we will always have some form of resentment in us that we can never entirely eliminate.  Maybe the best we can hope to do is to manage and control it.  Maybe our problem isn’t resentment itself; maybe it’s misplaced or misdirected resentment.
            Envy is always a bad thing, but resentment is not.  We should resent things that are illegal or immoral, but being rich, in and of itself, is neither of these.  What reason is there, other than envy, to resent the rich?  Can you come up with any instance where a rich person has directly caused you harm?  Maybe, whenever we have any feelings of resentment creep up on us, we should ask ourselves that type of question, which will let us know if the resentment is justified.
            OK, so we all know that we cannot justify resenting someone simply for being rich, what about them not paying their fair share of taxes?  The “rich” already pay the most in federal personal income taxes by far, and even if you don’t believe me or, if you believe me and still don’t think they pay enough, the rich don’t set their own tax rates, the government does.  If you’re going to resent anyone here, look to the folks in Washington D.C.
            How about all those celebrities and athletes?  They aren’t even employers.  Why do they deserve more money than someone who provides jobs and struggles with the challenges of running a business?  The way our economic system rewards individuals with success is based upon supply and demand.  As soon as you introduce subjective notions such as, “who deserves what” into the mix, you start slipping toward having a different type of economic system that doesn’t work as well.  We shouldn’t resent celebrities for the money they make, but when they use their positions to push political agendas and comment on things in which they have no expertise, they’re fair game.
            The people who we should resent are the ones that cause us harm.  This includes:
1)    Criminals – No explanation needed.
2)    Certain politicians – The ones who want to limit our freedoms and take even more of our hard-earned money.
3)    Certain government employees – The ones who receive far better salary and benefit packages than most people in the private sector could ever hope to have, and throw a fit when a debt-laden government asks them for even the smallest concession.
4)    Able bodied people living off the system – It’s not only unfair that they’re doing nothing while we all work to support them, they are essentially stealing resources from people who are truly in need.
5)    The mainstream media – They’re too short sighted to see that their left-biased reporting will in the end, will hurt themselves most of all.


           
           



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